Ben Folds // So There

Categories:  Music Reviews    Music
Wednesday, September 30th, 2015 at 11:45 AM
Ben Folds // So There by B. Toy

Ben Folds

So There

New West Records

5/5 stars

After a decade of huge success, a lot of artists get complacent and lazy: release an album of B-sides or strip down their usual stylings into a bunch of drum-machine-backed schlock. Ben Folds takes the opposite tack here. The first eight songs use the talents of the nuevo-classical group yMusic to add rich layers of strings and horns to Folds’ often funky piano riffs. The title track’s bridge is a prime example of the striking depth that can be achieved by seven adroit musicians. But Folds doesn’t lose the usual quirky schtick of his lyrics, often combining the subtle trivialities of everyday life with the sublime and majestic. And speaking of majestic, one can find it in the final three tracks: “Concerto for Piano and Orchestra” was performed by Folds with the Nashville Symphony. There’s nothing complacent about an artist whose compositions remind a listener of Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue.” —Bryan Toy

Erie Reader: Vol. 7, No. 8
Now Available — Pick It Up Today

CURRENT

The condition of cannabis use in Pennsylvania

Potential devastation in the wake of EPA budget cuts 

How what we learn before the primary may matter through 2030 

This year, Earth Day Network and the March for Science have partnered to raise awareness.

If you’ve been inspired by the Women’s Marches you won’t want to miss the Penn State Behrend Gender Conference.

IN THIS ISSUE

The condition of cannabis use in Pennsylvania

Potential devastation in the wake of EPA budget cuts 

How what we learn before the primary may matter through 2030 

This year, Earth Day Network and the March for Science have partnered to raise awareness.

If you’ve been inspired by the Women’s Marches you won’t want to miss the Penn State Behrend Gender Conference.

David Lynch: The Art Life and Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me come to the Erie Art Museum

Semper Femina is a dense, literate work from a genius musician, full of complex ideas.

Subterranean Homesick Tommy

Franchise’s freedom sets open world game apart

The 92-year-old secular rabbi of American poetry, ferocious and funny as ever.