Death Cab for Cutie // Kintsugi

Categories:  Music    Music Reviews
Wednesday, April 15th, 2015 at 8:30 AM
Death Cab for Cutie // Kintsugi by Alex Bieler

Death Cab For Cutie

Kintsugi

Atlantic

3.5/5 stars

Kintsugi marks an interesting point in Death Cab for Cutie’s canon. It’s the first album to be released since 2011’s Codes and Keys, a release that was widely met with a resounding meh. Add in the departure of guitarist and producer Chris Walla (who still played on Kintsugi), and you have the ingredients for a band in flux. Then the band began releasing songs like “Black Sun” and “No Room in Frame” to build up anticipation for the latest album, a pair of synthy tracks that sounded less like a band that was resting on its laurels and more like one that was taking some of its best traits – intimate lyrics and chiming orchestration – and giving them a fresh twist. Even with Kintsugi’s strong start, the album does lull at times, with songs like “Everything’s a Ceiling” missing the mark. Still, Death Cab showed some spark on Kintsugi, resulting in a very solid record for the veteran group. – Alex Bieler

Erie Reader: Vol. 7, No. 8
Now Available — Pick It Up Today

CURRENT

The condition of cannabis use in Pennsylvania

Potential devastation in the wake of EPA budget cuts 

How what we learn before the primary may matter through 2030 

This year, Earth Day Network and the March for Science have partnered to raise awareness.

If you’ve been inspired by the Women’s Marches you won’t want to miss the Penn State Behrend Gender Conference.

IN THIS ISSUE

The condition of cannabis use in Pennsylvania

Potential devastation in the wake of EPA budget cuts 

How what we learn before the primary may matter through 2030 

This year, Earth Day Network and the March for Science have partnered to raise awareness.

If you’ve been inspired by the Women’s Marches you won’t want to miss the Penn State Behrend Gender Conference.

David Lynch: The Art Life and Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me come to the Erie Art Museum

Semper Femina is a dense, literate work from a genius musician, full of complex ideas.

Subterranean Homesick Tommy

Franchise’s freedom sets open world game apart

The 92-year-old secular rabbi of American poetry, ferocious and funny as ever.