"I Only Want To Forget"

Category:  BloggERy
Sunday, January 8th, 2012 at 11:13 AM
I Only Want To Forget by Jay Stevens
Washington Independent

It's hard to read this and realize that Congress has just passed a law that allows the government to capture and hold Americans in the same fashion:

ON Wednesday, America’s detention camp at Guantánamo Bay will have been open for 10 years. For seven of them, I was held there without explanation or charge. During that time my daughters grew up without me. They were toddlers when I was imprisoned, and were never allowed to visit or speak to me by phone. Most of their letters were returned as “undeliverable,” and the few that I received were so thoroughly and thoughtlessly censored that their messages of love and support were lost.

Some American politicians say that people at Guantánamo are terrorists, but I have never been a terrorist. Had I been brought before a court when I was seized, my children’s lives would not have been torn apart, and my family would not have been thrown into poverty. It was only after the United States Supreme Court ordered the government to defend its actions before a federal judge that I was finally able to clear my name and be with them again.

Worse still is the stigma that follows Boumediene and others held in indefinite detention as terror suspects. Because they have no recourse to a court, the details on their case never come to light, including even the charges against them. We are left to fill in their actions and evidence against them with our lurid imaginations colored by the events of September 11, 2001.

Instead, it could be that the agencies and government departments capturing and detaining these men are as competent as any other part of the government, and egregious mistakes have been made. Without opening up Guantanamo and trying the detainees, we may never find out.

Which may be the whole point of Guantanamo.

Erie Reader: Vol. 4, No. 17
Now Available — Pick It Up Today

CURRENT

LEAF hosts its final Movie in the Arboretum this Friday. It's going to be a kickin' time.

Enjoy a Black & White Affair to celebrate the release of a new compilation involving some of Erie's most prolific independent artists.

Stories you may have missed from the Erie Reader Archive. This week: Is the "runway to somewhere, we hope," really a "bridge to nowhere?"

Fantasy/ Sci-fi fans, take note - the Screamicorn is here!

 

California punk band sells out.

IN THIS ISSUE

The Art of Patricia Kearney: Selected Work 1975-2013

Erie Man Returns to Troubled Homeland to Document Crisis

No Second Guessing The New Depression starts with circus-like fanfare, but there's no funny business after that – only serious rhymes layered upon thick, jazzy samples that don't neglect the booming bottom-end we all appreciate.

If you are an inveterate fan of New Jersey pop-punk quartet The Gaslight Anthem, you will likely be disappointed or at least befuddled by their latest release.

After releasing their debut album back in 2011, Buffalo-quartet The Albrights return with their self-titled sophomore release, and the results are as catchy as ever.

The sole founding members of Spoon have mastered the art of piecing together separate sonic parts to create a memorable whole, carefully constructing songs with basic elements before adding special touches through audio engineering tricks to dazzle all of the headphone listeners out there.

German Heritage Festival, Zabawa Polish Festival, and the Erie County Fair -- all happening in two weeks!

Unicorns and vampires? FILM's got you covered, Erie.

Two nights, two killer shows: Chrome Moses w/ Daybreak Radio, and The Burning River Ramblers at King’s Rook Club.

Seventy years ago, three Erie brothers gave the ultimate sacrifice.