Street Fashionista: Lena Logvina

Categories:  Street Fashionista    Fashion
Tuesday, February 19th, 2013 at 11:15 PM
Street Fashionista: Lena Logvina by Leslie McAllister

We have all been handed down some gorgeous garment or piece of jewelry that was completely and uniquely special. Or perchance, we have found something at a thrift shop, antique store, or estate sale that we absolutely had to have.

The only flaw? It didn’t fit right. It was the wrong length, the sleeves were too short, it needed modernizing, the ring would make a better pendant – any or all of the above are true.

So what to do? Alter it. Make it your own. Mend the tear. Sew the button. Make the maxi a mini. You are your own designer, and that is what makes finding these diamonds in the rough so darn fun.

An old, beat-up pair of ‘80s pirate boots have a blown-out sole? Take them to Matt’s Shoe Repair on Peach Street by Grasshopper (cash only – pay upfront).

Have a gorgeous maxi dress you got from your grandmother, but it’s too long? Have it hemmed from the waist, keeping the integrity of the dress. Take it to my favorite, A Woman Tailor, in the Colony Plaza (you will meet her in a later column from me – wink, wink).

Found a lovely ring but it’s too blingy for a ringy? I can’t imagine a ring could ever be too garish, but take it to Lighthouse Jewelers. Ask for Chet – he will make you giggle, and he’s a master at fixing and altering your sparkly jewels.

The point is that there are endless possibilities to altering your vintage goodies. If you have the time and the resources, you can turn your treasured find into something that much more special. It also makes for great conversation, and you even might be supporting your local businesses by utilizing their expertise and talents.

Who? Lena Logvina

Where? 1201 Kitchen Art, Music, & Wine Event

Why Lena? She’s wearing vintage! She remade the coat by shortening the sleeves to fit her style. Her boots are vintage Italian leather that she has had for many years. The great thing is that they are always in fashion. She modernizes her look with some patterned tights and a great flowing mini. Of course, all of her copper jewelry is of her design.

What We Want to Know:

Describe your style: I am a chameleon when it comes to fashion. I love to change it up. I love new things, but I am not the trend-loving girl-next-door.

What are your favorite things to wear? I love wearing dresses and heels. Very ladylike.

How did you get into making jewelry? I was always interested in different forms of art and crafting. My parents make beautiful copper jewelry and wall art, Sizov Copper Art, and I was always around that, so it came naturally. And of course we all know Steve [Trohoske – local musician, and her significant other] and the use of bass and guitar strings just made sense.

What is your best selling piece? Hard to say – every piece is so unique and one-of-a-kind. I think my pick would be the tree earrings that I make from recycled guitar strings.

What is your favorite thing about Erie? My family, my friends, and the lake of course!

What do you miss about your hometown? Kiev, Ukraine – it’s one of my favorite cities in the world. I miss its history, architecture, and culture.

Lena’s jewelry can be found on Facebook at Lena Logvina, Jewelry Artist or email her at rozachkalena@gmail.com

 

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