The Gaslight Anthem // Hurt

Categories:  Music Reviews    Music
Wednesday, August 20th, 2014 at 7:45 AM
The Gaslight Anthem // Hurt by Bryan Toy

The Gaslight Anthem

Get Hurt

Virgin

3 Stars

If you are an inveterate fan of New Jersey pop-punk quartet The Gaslight Anthem, you will likely be disappointed or at least befuddled by their latest release, Get Hurt, which sounds like an entire album of bonus tracks. There are a few songs hidden in the middle of the album that tend toward their traditional hard-driving chants like “Rollin’ and Tumblin’” and “Helter Skeleton,” but as a group, the compositions are all over the place. The opening track, “Stay Vicious,” is a heavy-hitter, harkening back to a ‘70s-metal sound reminiscent of Black Sabbath, while the sappy-sweet “Break Your Heart” does its best to sound like any of the thousand ballads you might hear playing during dinner at a bar mitzvah. The second half of the album is particularly disjointed, as if the band had been saving up a bunch of songs they couldn’t fit into any other album so they threw them all together here. – Bryan Toy

Erie Reader: Vol. 7, No. 8
Now Available — Pick It Up Today

CURRENT

The condition of cannabis use in Pennsylvania

Potential devastation in the wake of EPA budget cuts 

How what we learn before the primary may matter through 2030 

This year, Earth Day Network and the March for Science have partnered to raise awareness.

If you’ve been inspired by the Women’s Marches you won’t want to miss the Penn State Behrend Gender Conference.

IN THIS ISSUE

The condition of cannabis use in Pennsylvania

Potential devastation in the wake of EPA budget cuts 

How what we learn before the primary may matter through 2030 

This year, Earth Day Network and the March for Science have partnered to raise awareness.

If you’ve been inspired by the Women’s Marches you won’t want to miss the Penn State Behrend Gender Conference.

David Lynch: The Art Life and Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me come to the Erie Art Museum

Semper Femina is a dense, literate work from a genius musician, full of complex ideas.

Subterranean Homesick Tommy

Franchise’s freedom sets open world game apart

The 92-year-old secular rabbi of American poetry, ferocious and funny as ever.