This is Your Gas Pipeline. This is Your Gas Pipeline in the Free Market.

Category:  BloggERy
Monday, December 12th, 2011 at 1:31 PM
This is Your Gas Pipeline. This is Your Gas Pipeline in the Free Market. by Jay Stevens
Irish Oil and Gas

A few days ago, I posted about a fire department that had to apply a fee-for-service revenue model to surrounding rural areas because the residents there refused to pony up tax money to properly fund their fire service. The model, naturally, had a devestating effect on one particular homeowner and was an excellent demonstration why privatization doesn't work for critical community services.

And yet free-marketers insist on privatizing.

Free-marketers also feel government regulations are a hindrance to business. They might be, if your business is cutting corners and thereby endangering local residents and workers:

Like many other lines crisscrossing the state's Marcellus Shale regions, this pipe was big - a high-pressure steel line, 20 inches in diameter, large enough to help move a buried ocean of natural gas out of this corner of the state. It was also plenty big enough to set off a sizable explosion if something went wrong.

There was trouble on the job. Far too many of the welds that tied the pipe sections together were failing inspection and had to be done over.

A veteran welder, now an organizer for a national pipeline union, happened upon the line and tried to blow the whistle on what he considered substandard work.

But there was no one to call.

Pennsylvania's regulators don't handle those pipelines, and acknowledge they don't even know where they are. And when he reported what he saw to a federal oversight agency, an inspector told him there was nothing he could do, either.

Because the line was in a rural area, no safety rules applied.

Great, huh? No wonder these people don't want any pesky regulations overseeing their business.

That's probably the same reason the energy industry got itself a nice exemption from the Clean Water Act.

Erie Reader: Vol. 5, No. 15
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CURRENT

United Way and the Bayfront East Side Taskforce team up for movies and books at Nate Levy Park.

In an era of 140 characterisms, two local students are acknowledged for their essay skills. 

"New Americans" filmmaker finds new subjects, new stories from outpost in Botswana. 

Aaron Cox has his mentor Mike Trout to thank and some strikes to throw now that he has a chance at making it in the big leagues.

With 40 years of interviewing experience, James LeCorchick goes back and recalls the good ones, the bad ones, and the just plain ugly ones.

IN THIS ISSUE

Aaron Cox has his mentor Mike Trout to thank and some strikes to throw now that he has a chance at making it in the big leagues.

With 40 years of interviewing experience, James LeCorchick goes back and recalls the good ones, the bad ones, and the just plain ugly ones.

The CEO of Nintendo, Satoru Iwata, passed away a week and a half ago. With his time in the gaming industry, he left a lasting legacy.

It's not every day you get to see musicians wear wrestling masks while performing. Catch Los Straighjackets at 8 Great Tuesdays.

While Tyler Smilo isn't from the Erie area, he sure has made a name here for himself, and that is what brought him to perform at WQLN Sounds Around Town.

Geek Army performs at Sherlock's/ Park Place for another awesome show for a great cause.

Surprise! Wilco has a new album called Star Wars, and it packs a punch.

The Pittsburgh trio's EP shows off their old-school rock sound.

Jason Isbell uses the quiet spaces on the album to his advantage, which channels a quiet devastion.

Kevin Parker, the musician behind Tame Impala, adds more synth and leaves behind some guitar on Currents.